BENGAL TIGER

I N S P I R A T I O N


This song followed a trip around Ranthambhore National Park. We actually saw a tiger lolling around in the sunshine beside a river. He was obviously very used to the whole process of being photographed and it even looked as if he was posing for the cameras. The local people did say that sighting a tiger is very lucky and we certainly did consider ourselves very fortunate. The song gained a semi final position in the Song of the Year Contest (2015). Please click on Soundcloud  if you would like to listen to this song.


Bengal Tiger

“I have been out spotting leopards”, said the man I met today.

That seemed to me a little strange, as I thought they were born that way.

What seems a little stranger, because, I do not see how he can,

When he told me that tomorrow spotting tigers was his plan.

If tiger spotting beckons and you are not in a zoo,

Beware; the Bengal tiger could be out there spotting you.

 

He told me he’d been up at dawn when outside it was dark.

The morning sun was shining as he drove around the park.

He could not really think the cats were very far away,

But they’d already decided they were not coming out today.

If tiger spotting is a course of action you’d pursue,

Beware; the Bengal tiger could be out there spotting you.

 

There was no trace of feline in the scrub or by the lake,

Although, he said he saw a crocodile, a mongoose and a snake

And then he said an elephant, and a monkey up a tree.

They blend in with the background, so it makes them hard to see.

If tiger spotting features on your list of things to do,

Beware; the Bengal tiger could be out there spotting you.

 

If a tiger took the notion, and he got in hunting mode,

He’d paw the ground, then lick his lips and sidle down the road.

He’d stay downwind and sniff the air, to see what he could find,

Then he’d summon up his faculties to take you from behind.

If tiger spotting is your way to kill an hour or two,

Beware; the Bengal tiger could be out there spotting you.

 

Paul J Openshaw (March 2013)


© Paul J Openshaw 2012